An analysis of the character of celie in section three of the book the color purple by alice walker

She demands to be called by her real name, Mary Agnes, and she pursues a singing career. Too weak to stand up to his father, Shug leaves him; throughout the rest of his life, he regrets that he did not marry Shug. He grew up under the oppressive thumb of a strict and demanding father, who stood in the way of Albert pursuing Shug, the true love of his life.

Celie is about to go into adolescence, believing that she was raped by her father and that he killed both of their children. She scream at me. Celie also learns from Shug the life-enabling philosophy of believing in herself.

Sofia refuses to submit to whites, men, or anyone else who tries to dominate her. The idea of beginning a novel with the fact of a rape is repugnant to them. She tells Celie that she believes that God gets angry if a person does not take time to admire the color purple in a field.

Accordingly, Walker handles it head-on, immediately. This sense of intimacy is further enhanced by the fact that Celie writes all the letters of the first part of the novel to God, the only one she dares tell the horrors of her adolescent years: From adolescence into adulthood, Celie endures sexual, physical, and emotional abuse; still she remains a caring and gentle soul who finds it easy to love when she feels loved.

Tashi An Olinka girl educated in the Western manner, Tashi elects to undergo the ritual female circumcision and face scarring of the Olinka, then feels ashamed of having done so. It is this philosophy of self-sufficiency that brings the novel to a happy ending for Celie.

It is not surprising that the two women form a strong bond of friendship that last throughout the novel. Despite all the odds, Celie held on. In the ends, she finally leaves him, tired of his abuse. As a result, from early in the novel, Shug is picture as a life-giver to Celie.

Facial scarification and clitoridectomy continue among the Olinka in a vain attempt to maintain a dying culture while the economic base of the society has been completely destroyed.

She survives a stepfather who rapes her and steals her babies and also survives an abusive husband. Retrieved September 16, More important, the African subplot is not satisfactorily resolved in the novel.

Grady is a loving and sweet man, but also a womanizer. Suggestive of royalty, creativity, surprise, it becomes for Celie symbolic of the wonder of the creativity of God. He tries to befriend her, helping her in her work and designing shirts to go with the pants that she makes and sells.

She learned to fight, to stand up for herself, and she was rewarded. And soft and strong. It is difficult for her to learn because she is both physically and emotionally beaten by her abuse; but she never gives up trying.

As husband and wife, she and Harpo do battle for years, for she refuses to follow the expectations of the patriarchal lifestyle. She also visits her often during the years of her confinement, encouraging her and giving her strength. Walker, however, wanted to communicate that gender oppression compounds and complicates racist oppression.

Anecdotes are told in a traditional storytelling setting, with a community of people participating, their reactions also recorded. They are "bad seeds," and they disappear midway through the novel; Bub is always in trouble with the law, and the others merely run away.

The Color Purple Analysis

It is only after this point that Celie begins writing her letters to Nettie; this change corresponds with her growing disillusionment with God. Speakers of black English often omit endings for past tense, third person singular present, and possessives; the same verb form is used for all tenses and persons.

This friendship, which crosses cultural boundaries, serves as an example of the strength of relationships between women. She then sends Nettie away from the farm to protect her from Albert, even though it means she will lose the only family and friend she has in the world.

When Celie returns to live in Georgia, he comes close to apologizing to her, saying that he did not know how to appreciate her when they were married.Aug 12,  · Proudfit, Charles L.

“Celie’s Search for Identity: A Psychoanalytic Developmental Reading of Alice Walker’s The Color Purple.” Contemporary Literature 32, no. 1 (Spring, ): Proudfit offers a good example of a psychoanalytic approach to the development of Celie’s self-concept.

The Color Purple, then, is a story about growth, endurance, loyalty, solidarity, and joy — all nurtured by the strength of love. The Color Purple is a book by Alice Walker.

The Color Purple study guide contains a biography of Alice Walker, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and an. - Metamorphosis of Celie in The Color Purple In the book The Color Purple () by Alice Walker, the main character Celie develops from an abused, shy and browbeaten teenage girl into a strong, mature and self-confident woman.

The Color Purple

Need help on characters in Alice Walker's The Color Purple? Check out our detailed character descriptions. The Color Purple Characters from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes. Sign In Sign Up.

Lit. Guides. Lit. Terms. Shakespeare. Translations. LitCharts: (read full character analysis) Nettie. Celie 's more attractive younger sister.

Metamorphosis of Celie in Alice Walker's Color Purple Essay Words | 5 Pages Metamorphosis of Celie in The Color Purple In the book The Color Purple () by Alice Walker, the main character Celie develops from an abused, shy and browbeaten teenage girl into a strong, mature and self-confident woman.

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An analysis of the character of celie in section three of the book the color purple by alice walker
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